Comments for Pete's Wildlife Blog http://peterstreet.com.au/blog Shooting what I love Fri, 08 Jul 2016 08:46:11 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.3.11 Comment on Mind your step – Red-bellied Black Snakes! by Pete http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47&cpage=1#comment-3823 Fri, 08 Jul 2016 08:46:11 +0000 http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47#comment-3823 welcome to give me a call next time one pops up, 0417364620

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Comment on Mind your step – Red-bellied Black Snakes! by Pete http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47&cpage=1#comment-3822 Fri, 08 Jul 2016 08:45:25 +0000 http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47#comment-3822 Depends on the conditions inside your home, cats, access to shelter, hiding spots and food.

Assuming you live down this way, central coast, NSW, things have cooled down and a young snake with reasonable condition could easily make it a few months until the weather warms up and allows the snake to be more active.

Should you have the snake in a heated room, its possible for the snake to be more active sooner, either way, being careful for where you step, and where you allow your pets to roam for now would be a sensible idea.

Some tips which can help locate lost snakes, include talc on smooth surfaced floors like tiles or timber floors, showing the trails of where the snake might pass between hiding spots. And using plastic bags around the edges of the room, as they would other wise be silent, the rustling bags can alert you to their movements.

Should you like a chat my number is 0417364620

Peter

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Comment on Mind your step – Red-bellied Black Snakes! by Rob http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47&cpage=1#comment-3821 Fri, 08 Jul 2016 03:14:13 +0000 http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47#comment-3821 Unfortunately and contrary to my wishes, yesterday my kids brought home a 20 to 25cm baby red belly black snake and it escaped in the house. We cant find it. How long will it survive?

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Comment on Mind your step – Red-bellied Black Snakes! by Carly http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47&cpage=1#comment-3698 Tue, 12 Apr 2016 10:13:41 +0000 http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47#comment-3698 Hi Pete,
We have recently found what we think are three baby red bellied black snakes in our yard on the central coast. They have been about 10-15 cm in length. We have three children and a dog. Firstly are they born this small and secondly is there normally a mum hanging around. I am terrified to walk down the side of the house in the case I will come face to the face with mother snake.

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Comment on Mind your step – Red-bellied Black Snakes! by Susan http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47&cpage=1#comment-3361 Mon, 19 Oct 2015 10:44:14 +0000 http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47#comment-3361 thanks Pete

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Comment on Mind your step – Red-bellied Black Snakes! by Pete http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47&cpage=1#comment-3340 Sun, 11 Oct 2015 13:18:23 +0000 http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47#comment-3340 Sounds a lot like red belly visiting your property, they are capable swimmers, and will feed on mice and rats, as well as frogs.

There are other species which can have a pink belly, including Small Eyed Snakes and Golden Crowned Snakes, though they’re more likely to be active at night, unless disturbed, and generally feed on other prey.

If you can get a picture, i’m happy to help ID

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Comment on Mind your step – Red-bellied Black Snakes! by Susan http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47&cpage=1#comment-3329 Fri, 09 Oct 2015 04:54:17 +0000 http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47#comment-3329 Hi Pete,

I am trying to identify a new friend living in our NSW mid north coast property. I think it is a RBB – thin and long and pale pink belly, he swam across the river really quickly one day…yesterday I came face to face with him in a dark tin shed that was full of mice. Its just that some things i read said that they have a head that is not distinguishable from the body…but i think …before I ran away…this guy has a more pretty head like a python shape. does this mean it is something else? cheers Susan

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Comment on Mind your step – Red-bellied Black Snakes! by Pete http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47&cpage=1#comment-398 Wed, 02 Jul 2014 17:05:21 +0000 http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47#comment-398 Alison sounds like you have a lovely garden visitor, from doing snake rescues have seen a few Common Striped Marsh Frogs regurgitated, which is a reflex from the snake from being trapped while i’m on my way there. During a local rescue, even got to see the frog being consumed. Gruesome, but thankfully Marsh Frogs are notoriously prolific.

Would love to see pics if you have any to share of your visiting snakes? especially of a climbing red belly!

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Comment on Mind your step – Red-bellied Black Snakes! by Pete http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47&cpage=1#comment-397 Wed, 02 Jul 2014 16:59:27 +0000 http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47#comment-397 That is a lovely snake you have there in your blog, however you have seen a Copperhead! Congratulations, a beaut specimen and species i’d love to see in the wild someday.

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Comment on Mind your step – Red-bellied Black Snakes! by Pete http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47&cpage=1#comment-396 Wed, 02 Jul 2014 16:52:28 +0000 http://peterstreet.com.au/blog/?p=47#comment-396 Apologies for the delay, have recovered my blog following a forced upgrade – my website outlived my website host!

Based on the Central Coast, NSW, I live to help with these kinds of challenges, while snakes can be trapped, there are guidelines to ensure their (and your safety). Commercial traps are available, though it may be more practical to lease them from a researcher – as you’d only require them for a short amount of time and likely many of them to improve your chances of success.

Researchers employ a few methods, including a drift fence and a bucket, or funnel traps, both of these would need to be checked regularly, to avoid the risk of heat stress, predation; by cats, dogs, or birds – especially kookaburras, with their formidable snag-obliterating beaks! Perhaps, and this is a bit cheeky, the simpler method, is technically not capturing the snake, but placing a sheet of tin down in your garden, which permits the snake to come and go as it pleases, however when inspected may be relocated with ease.

The chances of another snake visiting are likely, becoming familiar with the snake species in your area can be a great idea – as many are harmless, it can be nice to have these reducing pest populations around your home and chemical free, at no cost.

PS. To use traps legally, requires permits in many parts if not all of Australia, as snakes are protected fauna, however it is also illegal to kill snakes, so I admire your consideration for wanting to relocate the snake!

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